Menu ENN Search

Nutrition funding: The missing piece of the puzzle

News

Summary of report*

A recent report by Generation Nutrition, a coalition of 85 civil society organisations, describes both why funding matters to nutrition and the current situation with regard to donor funding and domestic resources. The report calculates that, at the current rate of progress, countries will miss the 2025 World Health Assembly (WHA) targets on stunting and acute malnutrition by a significant margin (see Table 1), let alone the more ambitious Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Increasing funding is essential if these and the other global nutrition targets are to be met on time. Progress in meeting the WHA stunting and wasting targets are respectively 20 and five years behind schedule.

Table 1: Poor performance on the WHA global targets on stunting and acute malnutrition

In 2013, the UK hosted the Nutrition for Growth (N4G) event, a high-level summit resulting in over US$23 billion pledged to improve nutrition up to 2020. This was a substantial commitment, but ultimately not enough to end malnutrition in all its forms, as promised by world leaders. The report by Generation Nutrition describes the ‘London Legacy’ as presenting challenges in relation to the implementation of the deal; for example, of the eight donors who supplied data on nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive aid spending in 2013, only 64% of the aid pledged for that year was actually disbursed. Moreover, the 2015 Global Nutrition Report, which tracks N4G commitments, revealed that 13 donors were spending either less than US$1 million per annum or nothing at all on nutrition-specific programmes. Furthermore, only a relatively small share of donor budgets in supposedly nutrition-sensitive sectors is being targeted directly at improving nutrition – 3% out of 21% spend on health agriculture, WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) and education.  

The 2016 N4G summit in Rio de Janeiro did not turn out to be a pledging summit, as had originally been envisaged. The Generation Nutrition campaign is calling for the next high-level nutrition funding summit to be announced immediately and for all stakeholders to step up and pledge ambitious and SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-bound) financial commitments. At this next summit, they want donors to agree to a doubling of global aid to nutrition by 2020, and for southern governments to agree to increase their budget allocated to nutrition, starting with (but not restricted to) the health sector.

Recommendations

Recommendations made in the report are in line with priorities from states and other donors who are part of the N4G initiative. They relate to measures which, if implemented, would help either to increase nutrition funding or to improve the impact of existing programmes.

All international donors

For southern countries

For all stakeholders

 

*Nutrition Funding: the missing piece of the puzzle. A Generation Nutrition briefing paper. June 2016. www.generation-nutrition.org/sites/default/files/editorial/missing_piece_of_the_puzzle.pdf

 

 

More like this

FEX: Global Nutrition Report

This Global Nutrition Report (GNR) is the first in an annual series. It tracks worldwide progress in improving nutrition status, identifies bottlenecks to change, highlights...

NEX: 2016 Global Nutrition Report From Promise to Impact: Ending Malnutrition by 2030

By Lawrence Haddad, Corinna Hawkes and Emorn Udomkesmalee, Global Nutrition Report Independent Expert Group Co-Chairs Ending malnutrition by 2030 is a lot to ask, but the...

NEX: The Grand Bargain

A new deal for humanitarian aid The 'Grand Bargain' is the name given to a package of reforms to make humanitarian aid financing more efficient and effective. It was launched...

FEX: Grand Bargain: Reform or business as usual?

Views Summary of comments* and review** Location: Global What we know: Inadequate resources are a severe and increasing constraint on humanitarian action in the face of...

Resource: Global Nutrition Report 2015

Children whose growth is stunted, people who don't get enough vitamins and minerals for a healthy life, adults who are overweight and obese—malnutrition takes many forms...

FEX: Financing the sustainable scale-up of CMAM in high-burden countries

Summary of research1 Location: Global What we know: Investment in the scale-up of community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM) is needed to reduce global...

Resource: Closing the gap: towards a 2030 wasting target. A policy briefing by Generation Nutrition.

Generation nutrition is a global campaign, calling on governments and the international community to take urgent action to prioritise the fight against acute malnutrition, and...

FEX: Refugee crisis presents a human paradox

Research snapshot1 The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) estimates that 65 million people in the world today have been displaced by violence or armed...

FEX: Equity in Donor Aid Allocation to Iraq

Loading food aid in Iraq Two short articles in a recent issue of the Lancet question the overall level of aid given and pledged to post-conflict Iraq1,2. One author (Singh)...

Investing in Nutrition: the Foundation for Development

'Investing in Nutrition: the Foundation for Development' provides a summary of a costing analysis for global nutrition targets created by the World Health Assembly...

en-net: Nutrition Commitments and Accountability

As a means of increasing accountability, there is increasing discussion in the nutrition arena, and wider world of sustainable development, about the need for...

FEX: New IFPRI report

The respected International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) recently published the results of its predictions of the future of food access and consumption in a report...

en-net: Launch of a global research prioritisation exercise for acute malnutrition

The No Wasted Lives Coalition aims to accelerate global action by building knowledge about the prevention and treatment of acute...

FEX: A multisector approach to monitoring planned and actual nutrition spending

By Amanda Pomeroy-Stevens, Alexis D'Agostino, Madhukar B Shrestha and Abel Muzoora Amanda Pomeroy-Stevens is Research and Evaluation Advisor on the USAID-funded SPRING Project...

FEX: National and local actor’s share of global humanitarian funding

Summary of report1 Location: Global What we know: Emergency aid funding has risen tenfold in the last 14 years. What this article adds: A recent review of national and...

Nutrition for Growth

The Rio Olympics are less than one month away- a moment when the entire world comes together to cheer on their teams and celebrate sporting achievements! It's also a golden...

FEX: Public financing of health in developing countries

Summary of published research1 Increasing amounts of international aid have been given to health sectors in developing countries. Development assistance for health (DAH) has...

FEX: An investment framework for nutrition: Reaching the global targets for stunting, anaemia, breastfeeding and wasting

Summary of research* Location: Global What we know: Child malnutrition has lifelong consequences for heath, human capital, economic development, prosperity and equity. Global...

FEX: Nutrition, resilience and the genesis of AGIR

By Jan Eijkenaar Jan Eijkenaar has been ECHO's Technical Assistant in support of a resilience approach and the roll out of the AGIR Alliance from September 2012 to April 2015,...

FEX: Effect of food prices on household food security and malnutrition

Summary of report1 In 2007 and 2008, international food and oil prices soared causing riots in over 30 countries. Despite cereal prices falling on the global market, recent...

Close

Reference this page

Generation Nutrition (2016). Nutrition funding: The missing piece of the puzzle. Field Exchange 53, November 2016. p57. www.ennonline.net/fex/53/nutritionfunding