Menu ENN Search

Access to Nutrition Index

The Global Access to Nutrition Index (ATNI) 2018 aims to track the contribution of food and beverage (F&B) manufacturers to address global nutrition challenges by helping to improve diets worldwide. As incomes increase, consumers tend to eat and drink more packaged foods and beverages, driving growth in the F&B industry, particularly in emerging markets. The 22 F&B manufacturers assessed in the 2018 ATNI operate in over 200 countries and generate approximately US$500 billion in sales. They therefore have a huge impact on the diets of consumers and the lives of their employees and have an important role to play in addressing the world’s nutrition challenges.

In his blog Development Horizons Lawrence Haddad summarises the findings of the 2018 ATNI. The “good news” is that most companies are “upping their game” in terms of their ATNI scores, possibly because of the index itself, with Nestlé leading the way as the highest-scoring company with 6.8 out of 10, up from 5.9 in 2016. The average score across all companies, however, is low at 3.3 and some companies’ scores declined. Of the companies that defined targets to reformulate their products (n=16), all only did so for some of their products for some nutritional components, with little clarity on baselines and timelines.

Improvements are also needed in terms of targets relating to positive components of a healthy diet (such as fruits and vegetables); responsible marketing to children and adolescents in all media; offering facilities to express and store breast milk and paid parental leave; commitment to label all nutrients globally; commitment to lobby in support of measures to prevent and address obesity; and to have global policies to make nutritious food more available and accessible to all. The report recommends that companies commit to reformulate all products (reducing salt, sugar and fat where needed and increase nutrients and fibre-rich ingredients); have a programme to support breastfeeding parents; market responsibly to all children 0-18 years of age in all media, with no exceptions; and agree not to lobby against the introduction of diet-related public health measures for which there is a scientific consensus. Lawrence states: “Food companies must be celebrated when they get it right and show progress and be called out when they do not. This report does this in a clear, balanced and therefore powerful way”.

More like this

FEX: Policy brief on engagement between public and private sectors for nutrition

Summary of research1 Location: Global What we know: Worldwide 'nutrition transition', including in low-middle income countries is leading to increasing consumption of...

FEX: Packaged foods: What role can they play in improving consumption of nutritious food?

Research snapshot1 Lawrence Haddad recently attended a side event on packaged foods at the 2018 EAT forum in Stockholm, following which he wrote a blog about the experience...

FEX: Global Hunger Index Report

The 2014 Global Hunger Index (GHI) report - the ninth in an annual series - presents a multidimensional measure of national, regional, and global hunger in the shape of the...

NEX: Delivering high-quality, locally produced and fortified blended food products in West Africa

Sofia Condes is a public health economist working for GAIN in the Food Policy and Finance Team, with a focus on francophone Africa and Latin America. Jennifer Dahdah is a...

FEX: Draft Guidelines for the Marketing of Ready to Use Supplemental Foods for Children

In the absence of guidelines to govern the marketing of ready to use supplemental foods (RUSFs), members of the UNSCN NGO/CSO constituency drafted a guidance to specifically...

Blog post: The private sector in nutrition - a player by default or choice? Reflections from a multi-stakeholder meeting

I participated in a Round Table organised by South Asia Food and Nutrition Security Initiative SAFANSI In Colombo in June which was titled “Putting the Lens on the...

FEX: Violations of the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes: Indonesia context

Research snapshot1 Information and promotional materials produced by breast-milk substitute (BMS) companies and the distribution of free samples of BMS have a well understood...

FEX: Infant formula advertising in medical journals: a cross-sectional study (and struggle to publish)

By Sarah Morgan, Tony Waterston and Marko Kerac View this article as a pdf Sarah Morgan is a Public Health Registrar currently working with National Health Service (NHS)...

en-net: Does the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes applies for Ready to Use commercially produced complementary foods ?

this question is regarding how the Code applies to commercially produced complementary foods and if they could be used as a demonstration method by health workers for...

NEX: ‘True Sri Lankan Taste’ food outlets: Promoting indigenous foods for healthier diets

Lisez cet article en français ici View this article as a pdf Disna Rathnasinghe is Additional Director in Agribusiness Development in the Department of Agriculture,...

FEX: Nutrition and the urban consumer

By Jennifer Christian and Abel Irena The 'Pusha Love' campaign in Lesotho is about preventing HIV which uses positive dialogue about the future to talk about how to change...

FEX: Transforming media coverage of nutrition in Kenya

By Titus Mung'ou Lisez cet article en français ici At the time of writing, Titus Mung'ou was the Advocacy and Communications Manager at Action Against Hunger (ACF) and...

en-net: Your opinion sought on draft guidance to regulate marketing of Ready to Use Supplemental Foods

Ready to use supplemental foods (RUSFs) are receiving increasing attention by agencies working to alleviate problems of malnutrition. In late 2010, members of the NGO/Civil...

NEX: UN Decade of Action on Nutrition: Brazil, Ecuador and Italy make commitments

View this article as a pdf Lisez cet article en français ici Trudy Wijnhoven is a Nutrition Officer and the technical focal point for the UN Decade of Action on...

en-net: Nestle Boycott - is it working?

The boycott is one of the largest boycotts in the commercial history. I am aware of the historical background and the various efforts. To me, the various efforts to sustain...

Blog post: Reflections Following Kenya’s Second Agri-nutrition conference

Background: I attended Kenya's 2nd Agri-nutrition conference held in Nairobi from 11th - 13th of September 2018. The 3-day forum was co-hosted by the Ministry of Agriculture,...

NEX: Nutrition advocacy in Kenya’s newly devolved government system

Titus Mung'ou was the Advocacy and Communications Manager at Action Against Hunger (ACF) at the time of writing. Jacob Korir is the Head of Health and Nutrition and Health...

FEX: Use and misuse of stunting as a measure of child health

Research snapshot1 The term “stunting” has become pervasive in international nutrition and child health research, programme and policy circles. Although originally...

NEX: SUN and the private sector: Business networks in Nigeria and Niger

Ambarka Youssoufane is ENN's West and Central Africa Knowledge Management Specialist. He observed and summarised the Business Network meetings in Nigeria and...

NEX: What's new at ENN?

Nutrition Exchange: Preliminary results from user survey ENN conducted an impact survey in late 2017 with the aim of understanding how our global network of practitioners and...

Close

Reference this page

Access to Nutrition Index. Field Exchange 58, September 2018. p48. www.ennonline.net/fex/58/accesstonutritionindex

(ENN_6104)

Close

Download to a citation manager

The below files can be imported into your preferred reference management tool, most tools will allow you to manually import the RIS file. Endnote may required a specific filter file to be used.