Menu ENN Search

Report of the South Asia ‘Stop stunting: No time to Waste’ conference

View this article as a pdf

Report summary1

In May 2017 the first three-day South Asia regional ‘Stop Stunting’ conference was convened by the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) Regional Office for South Asia (ROSA). Entitled No Time to Waste, the conference brought together over 90 government representatives, academics, United Nations partners and civil society organisations from across South Asia to exchange experiences in addressing wasting in the context of broader nutrition programming. The conference aimed to position the care of children with severe wasting as an essential intervention to support optimal nutrition and development in the first years of life in South Asia.

Presentations by country and global actors explored the state of child wasting in the region, sharing best practices and providing insights into potential mechanisms to scale up services for severely wasted children. A key theme emerging from the conference was the need for a transformation in thinking and approaches in the region, shifting from a focus on stunting towards addressing all forms of undernutrition, including wasting. In response, countries developed visions for the future, outlining key advocacy, policy, programme and research priorities to scale up interventions.

Conference participants developed a set of 10 key actions to accelerate progress in the care of severely wasted children, as follows:

  1. Wasting must be addressed with greater urgency across all countries in South Asia.
  2. Wasting and stunting reduction should be addressed as two interconnected priorities.
  3. Programmes should deliver essential nutrition actions to prevent wasting and stunting and to treat severe wasting when preventative actions fail.
  4. Health-system actors have a primary role in delivering actions to prevent wasting and stunting, together with other sectors.
  5. Community-based platforms are needed to identify and refer wasted children as early as possible.
  6. Community-based care and treatment of wasting is needed to maximise the number of children successfully treated.
  7. Inpatient care is essential for severely wasted children with medical complications.
  8. Therapeutic food should conform to World Health Organization (WHO) specifications and can be produced in most countries.
  9. Policies and guidelines on the care and treatment of severe wasting should align with the latest WHO guidelines.
  10. Quality programme data are essential to track progress and inform scale-up of programmes.

The conference report concludes that, “with children’s survival, growth and development at stake, as well the economic prosperity of nations, it is essential that countries across South Asia put these key actions into practice.”

Read more...

More like this

FEX: South Asia and child wasting – unravelling the conundrum

View this article as a pdf By Harriet Torlesse and Minh Tram Le Background Each annual release of the Joint Malnutrition Estimates by United Nations Children's Fund...

FEX: Report of the South Asia ‘Stop stunting: Power of Maternal Nutrition’ conference

View this article as a pdf Report summary1 The second regional conference on stunting, held in May 2018, focused on efforts to scale up maternal nutritional care in South...

FEX: UN Global Action Plan (GAP) Framework for Child Wasting and the Asia and Pacific Region

View this article as a pdf By Harriet Torlesse, Roland Kupka, Warren T K Lee, Britta Schumacher and Angela de Silva Harriet Torlesse is the Regional Advisor Nutrition at the...

FEX: Improving maternal nutrition in South Asia: Implications for child wasting prevention efforts

View this article as a pdf By Zivai Murira and Harriet Torlesse Zivai Murira is Nutrition Specialist at United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Regional Office for South Asia...

Unlocking the power of maternal nutrition to improve nutritional care of women in South Asia

Unlocking the power of maternal nutrition to improve nutritional care of women in South Asia View this article as a pdf Zivai Murira is the Nutrition Specialist at UNICEF...

Leveraging the power of multiple systems to improve diets and feeding practices in early life in South Asia

View this article as a pdf Zivai Murira is the Nutrition Specialist at UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia, based in Kathmandu, Nepal. Harriet Torlesse is the Regional...

FEX: Editorial

View this article as a pdf A warm welcome to our 63rd edition of Field Exchange, focused on child wasting in South Asia. The idea for this issue came out of a meeting in New...

FEX: ENN update

View this article as a pdf Field Exchange Special issue on wasting in South Asia Asia is home to half of the world's wasted children (25.9 million) and severely wasted...

FEX: Report of the South Asia ‘Stop stunting: Improving Young Children’s Diets’ conference

View this article as a pdf Report summary1 The third regional conference on stunting hosted by the Secretariat of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC)...

Blog post: Stunting & Wasting in South Asia- Reflections from a Regional conference

Lire ce blog en francais Over the years the scope of ENN's work has expanded beyond a focus on humanitarian contexts to encompass a broader set of issues around drivers of...

FEX: Higher heights: a greater ambition for maternal and child nutrition in South Asia

Research Summary 1 Poor nutrition in early life threatens the growth and development of children, which has a knock-on effect on the sustainable development of nations. This...

FEX: South Asia Technical Advisory Group on Wasting

View this article as a pdf One of the major challenges in improving access for children to services to effectively prevent and treat child wasting in South Asia is evidence....

Editorial

View this article as a pdf Welcome to the second issue of Nutrition Exchange (NEX) South Asia. The South Asia region continues to bear the highest burden of child malnutrition...

FEX: Severe acute malnutrition: an unfinished agenda in East Asia and the Pacific

By Cecilia De Bustos, Cécile Basquin and Christiane Rudert Lisez cet article en français ici Cecilia De Bustos is a nutrition and public health specialist who...

FEX: No Wasted Lives: Accelerating action for children with acute malnutrition

By Saul Guerrero, Nancy Aburto, Erin Body, Diane Holland, Guy Holloway, Abigail Perry and Sophie Whitney Saul Guerrero is the Director of International Nutrition Initiatives...

FEX: Continuum of care for children with wasting in India: Opportunities for an integrated approach

View this article as a pdf Lisez cet article en français ici By Arjan de Wagt, Eleanor Rogers, Praveen Kumar, Abner Daniel, Harriet Torlesse and Saul Guerrero Arjan...

FEX: Wasting in South Asia: Consultation on building the evidence base on the policy and programme response

A one-day consultation was held in New York on 16 November 2018 to examine the evidence on wasting in South Asia and guide the direction of future collaborative efforts of the...

FEX: Factors associated with wasting among children under five years old in South Asia: Implications for action

View this article as a pdf Research snapshot1 The continued high prevalence and burden of child wasting in South Asia is an urgent policy priority. The region's progress...

The double burden of malnutrition among young children in South Asia: Policy and programme options

View this article as a pdf Dr Angela de Silva is the Regional Adviser, Nutrition and Health for Development, WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia. Dr Ayoub Al Jawalhdeh...

FEX: Wasting in South Asia: Building the evidence on policy and programme response

View this article as a pdf A one-day consultation organised by United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) was held in New York in 2018 to examine the evidence and guide the...

Close

Reference this page

Report of the South Asia ‘Stop stunting: No time to Waste’ conference. Field Exchange 63, October 2020. p90. www.ennonline.net/fex/63/stopstuntingconferencenotimetowaste

(ENN_6772)

Close

Download to a citation manager

The below files can be imported into your preferred reference management tool, most tools will allow you to manually import the RIS file. Endnote may required a specific filter file to be used.