Menu ENN Search

Risk factors associated with wasting and severe wasting among under-5 children in India

View this article as a pdf

This is a summary of the following report: Center for Health Research and Development & UNICEF India Country Office (2021) Analysis of wasting and severe wasting and its associated risk factors among under-5 children in India.

Wasting remains a major cause of child mortality and morbidity globally. Current guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis and management, especially among children under six months of age, are mainly based on studies conducted in African settings. In India, specific data for this age group is lacking. This paper, featuring the collaborative efforts of the Knowledge Integration and Translational Platform at the Centre for Health Research and Development, the Biotechnology Industry Research Assistance Council and UNICEF India, contains an in-depth analysis to understand the burden of wasting, including severe wasting, in India and its associated factors. The analysis utilised data from the Comprehensive National Nutrition Survey (CNNS) which included children 0 to 59 months (nationally representative), Knowledge Integration (KI) datasets which covered children aged 0 to 23 months (from 15 national studies) and the intervention group of an ongoing cohort, the Women and Infants Integrated Growth Study (WINGS) which included children aged 0 to 11 months (from a trial in Delhi).

Overall, the authors found a high prevalence of wasting in the CNNS and KI datasets, and a lower prevalence in WINGS (CNNS 17.3%, KI 16.4%, WINGS 5.8%), a pattern mirrored in the severe wasting estimates (4.9%, 3.7%, 0.5%, respectively). Across all datasets, the burden of wasting and severe wasting was highest in the first six months of life compared to older age groups. Children born small for gestational age or with low birth weight each displayed a higher prevalence of both wasting and severe wasting than appropriate for gestational age or and normal birthweight children, respectively. The incidence of wasting (new episodes of wasting) was 0.32 (KI) and 0.55 (WINGS) cases per 365 days follow-up. The patterns for incidence of wasting and severe wasting were comparable to the prevalence data.

In line with other studies, the factors that were associated with wasting were lower maternal education, maternal underweight, Caesarean section, low birthweight and being a male child. Wasting in the first six months of life was found to be an independent risk factor for wasting at 12 and 24 months of age (WINGS and KI datasets). The authors concluded that programmes should focus on health and nutrition interventions at pregnancy and pre-pregnancy time points (e.g., early identification of mothers at risk of undernutrition), as well as close growth monitoring and wasting management over the infant’s first 6 months of life, to counter the burden of wasting in early life and risks of wasting later in life.

More like this

FEX: Improving maternal nutrition in South Asia: Implications for child wasting prevention efforts

View this article as a pdf Lisez cet article en français ici By Zivai Murira and Harriet Torlesse Zivai Murira is Nutrition Specialist at United Nations Children's...

FEX: Child wasting and concurrent stunting in low- and middle-income countries

View this article as a pdf Click here to listen to an interview with one of the authors on the ENN podcast channel Summary of research1 What we know: Cross-sectional,...

FEX: South Asia and child wasting – unravelling the conundrum

View this article as a pdf Lisez cet article en français ici By Harriet Torlesse and Minh Tram Le Background Each annual release of the Joint Malnutrition Estimates...

FEX: Birthweight and feeding practices are associated with child growth outcomes in South Asia

View this article as a pdf Research snapshot1 Child wasting has received much less policy attention in South Asia than stunting, despite the region being home to over half...

FEX: Severe wasting among Indian infants under six months of age

View this article as a pdf Research snapshot1 The burden and risk factors for wasting among infants under six months of age in India are not well documented. Data from...

FEX: Higher heights: a greater ambition for maternal and child nutrition in South Asia

Research Summary 1 Poor nutrition in early life threatens the growth and development of children, which has a knock-on effect on the sustainable development of nations. This...

FEX: Exploring the relationships between wasting and stunting among a cohort of children under two years of age in Niger

View this article as a pdf Kohlmann K, Sudfeld C, Garba S, Guindo O, Grais R and Isanaka S (2021) Exploring the relationships between wasting and stunting among a cohort of...

The double burden of malnutrition among young children in South Asia: Policy and programme options

View this article as a pdf Dr Angela de Silva is the Regional Adviser, Nutrition and Health for Development, WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia. Dr Ayoub Al Jawalhdeh...

FEX: Continuum of care for children with wasting in India: Opportunities for an integrated approach

View this article as a pdf Lisez cet article en français ici By Arjan de Wagt, Eleanor Rogers, Praveen Kumar, Abner Daniel, Harriet Torlesse and Saul Guerrero Arjan...

Wasting and Stunting: Overcoming the divide

Wasting-Stunting (WaSt) Technical Interest Group (TIG) Donor: Irish Aid, USAID, OFDA Collaborators: Technical Interest Group ENN project lead: Tanya Khara Timeframe: 2014 -...

FEX: Wasting and Stunting Technical Interest Group (WaSt TIG) meeting

On the 15th of January 2018 the Wasting and Stunting (WaSt) Technical Interest Group (TIG) held their third face-to-face meeting at Trinity College, Oxford. This group of 30...

FEX: Burden and determinants of wasting in Southeast Asia and the overlap with stunting

View this article as a pdf Research snapshot1 The largest proportion of wasted children globally is found in Southeast Asia, yet this is not fully recognised as a public...

FEX: Burden and determinants of wasting in Southeast Asia and the overlap with stunting

Research snapshot1 The largest proportion of wasted children globally is found in Southeast Asia, yet this is not fully recognised as a public health problem and the coverage...

FEX: Factors associated with wasting among children under five years old in South Asia: Implications for action

View this article as a pdf Research snapshot1 The continued high prevalence and burden of child wasting in South Asia is an urgent policy priority. The region's progress...

FEX: The Wasting-Stunting Technical Interest Group: A summary of the work to date

View this article as a pdf Lisez cet article en français ici This article outlines the work of the Wasting-Stunting Technical Interest Group since its inception in...

FEX: Burden of child and maternal malnutrition and trends in states of India 1990-2017

View this article as a pdf Research snapshot1 India has a large and persistent burden of malnutrition. However, with a population of 1.4 billion people residing across states...

FEX: Causes and consequences of child growth failure in low- and middle-income countries

View this article as a pdf Click here to listen to an interview with one of the authors on the ENN podcast channel Research snapshot1 Wasting and stunting contribute to...

FEX: Improving maternal nutrition in South Asia: Implications for child wasting prevention efforts

This is a summary of a Field Exchange 'views' article that was included in issue 63 - a special edition on child wasting in South Asia. The original article was authored by...

MAMI Evidence

Evidence There are a range of ongoing research activities by the MAMI Global Network and its partners. See below for a list of peer-reviewed publications. Upcoming research...

FEX: Editorial

View this article as a pdf Editorial FEX67 Welcome to the 67th edition of Field Exchange which we are excited to announce includes a special subsection on the relationships...

Close

Reference this page

Risk factors associated with wasting and severe wasting among under-5 children in India. Field Exchange 67, April 2022. p88. www.ennonline.net/fex/67/indiawastingsummaryreport

(ENN_7357)

Close

Download to a citation manager

The below files can be imported into your preferred reference management tool, most tools will allow you to manually import the RIS file. Endnote may required a specific filter file to be used.