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Global guidance

WHO (2016) WHO recommendations on antenatal care for a positive pregnancy https://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/maternal_perinatal_health/anc-positive-pregnancy-experience/en/

UNICEF-WHO (2019) Low birthweight estimates. Levels and trends 2000-2015 www.unicef.org/media/53711/file/UNICEFWHO Low birthweight estimates 2019 .pdf 

Regional reports

Stop Stunting / Power of Maternal Nutrition

The report from the conference on Scaling up the Nutritional Care of Women in South Asia, 7-9 May 2018, Kathmandu, Nepal, summarises findings from this event, attended by countries and experts in the region: https://wcmsprod.unicef.org/rosa/reports/stop-stunting

Policy and programme landscape

Currently in press, this policy and programme landscape review examines the extent to which national policies in South Asian countries are in line with the 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations on maternal nutrition, and provides insights on the health system bottlenecks that are constraining the translation of these policies to programme action.

UNICEF (2019). Nutritional care of pregnant women in South Asia: Policy environment and programme action. UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia: Kathmandu. Contact UNICEF ROSA for the report.

Published literature

Maternal and Child Nutrition provides an invaluable source of up-to-date information for health professionals, academics and service users, covering topics such as pre-conception, antenatal and postnatal maternal nutrition, and women’s nutrition throughout their reproductive years. Two recent supplements on South Asia have highlighted the importance of maternal nutrition.

Stop Stunting supplement

Stop stunting: Improving child feeding, women’s nutrition and household sanitation in South Asia. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 12(Suppl 1), https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/17408709/2016/12/S1

Higher Heights supplement

Higher heights: A greater ambition for maternal and child nutrition in South Asia. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 14(Suppl 4) https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/17408709/2018/14/S4

Nguyen et al. (2017). Integrating Nutrition Interventions into an Existing Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Health Program Increased Maternal Dietary Diversity, Micronutrient Intake, and Exclusive Breastfeeding Practices in Bangladesh: Results of a Cluster-Randomized Program Evaluation. Journal of Nutrition www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5697969/

‘How to’ guide

Results from a feasibility study conducted by Alive & Thrive (A&T) in Bangladesh shows that integrating maternal nutrition into maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) programmes is both effective and attainable. This brief outlines how to deliver nutrition interventions as key components of MNCH programmes to achieve scale and impact in Bangladesh.

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Resources

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Unlocking the power of maternal nutrition to improve nutritional care of women in South Asia

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FEX: Improving maternal nutrition in South Asia: Implications for child wasting prevention efforts

View this article as a pdf By Zivai Murira and Harriet Torlesse Zivai Murira is Nutrition Specialist at United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Regional Office for South Asia...

FEX: Higher heights: a greater ambition for maternal and child nutrition in South Asia

Research Summary 1 Poor nutrition in early life threatens the growth and development of children, which has a knock-on effect on the sustainable development of nations. This...

FEX: Improving maternal nutrition in South Asia: Implications for child wasting prevention efforts

This is a summary of a Field Exchange 'views' article that was included in issue 63 - a special edition on child wasting in South Asia. The original article was authored by...

FEX: Nutrition Exchange (NEX) South Asia: Maternal nutrition

View this article as a pdf In its first-ever regional issue, Nutrition Exchange has partnered with the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Regional Office of South Asia...

Blog post: Stunting & Wasting in South Asia- Reflections from a Regional conference

Lire ce blog en francais Over the years the scope of ENN's work has expanded beyond a focus on humanitarian contexts to encompass a broader set of issues around drivers of...

FEX: Report of the South Asia ‘Stop stunting: Power of Maternal Nutrition’ conference

View this article as a pdf Report summary1 The second regional conference on stunting, held in May 2018, focused on efforts to scale up maternal nutritional care in South...

FEX: South Asia and child wasting – unravelling the conundrum

View this article as a pdf By Harriet Torlesse and Minh Tram Le Background Each annual release of the Joint Malnutrition Estimates by United Nations Children's Fund...

FEX: Delivery of maternal nutrition interventions at scale and mainstreaming into the health system in Bangladesh

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FEX: South Asia and child wasting – unravelling the conundrum

This is a summary of a Field Exchange field article that was included in issue 63 - a special edition on child wasting in South Asia. The original article was authored by...

FEX: Improving women’s nutrition is imperative for the rapid reduction of childhood stunting in South Asia

View this article as a pdf Research Snapshot1 Maternal factors, both nutritional and non-nutritional, are a significant contributor to high rates of undernutrition in...

FEX: South Asia Technical Advisory Group on Wasting

View this article as a pdf One of the major challenges in improving access for children to services to effectively prevent and treat child wasting in South Asia is evidence....

FEX: Maternal nutrition interventions in Bangladesh: delivery at scale and mainstreaming into the health system

This is a summary of a Field Exchange field article that was included in issue 63 - a special edition on child wasting in South Asia. The original article was authored by...

Blog post: Prioritising Maternal Nutrition in South Asia - Reflections from a regional conference

Earlier this month, I attended a meeting organised jointly by the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) and the UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia (ROSA)...

FEX: Effectiveness of programme approaches to improve the coverage of maternal nutrition interventions in South Asia

View this article as a pdf Summary of research1 The nutritional status of women before and during pregnancy and after delivery has far-reaching consequences for maternal...

FEX: Factors associated with wasting among children under five years old in South Asia: Implications for action

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Leveraging the power of multiple systems to improve diets and feeding practices in early life in South Asia

View this article as a pdf Zivai Murira is the Nutrition Specialist at UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia, based in Kathmandu, Nepal. Harriet Torlesse is the Regional...

FEX: Editorial

View this article as a pdf A warm welcome to our 63rd edition of Field Exchange, focused on child wasting in South Asia. The idea for this issue came out of a meeting in New...

FEX: Aiming higher for maternal and child nutrition in South Asia

View this article as a pdf Research snapshot1 South Asia has the greatest burden of wasted and stunted children of any region in the world. These children are more likely to...

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Resources. Nutrition Exchange Asia 1, June 2019. p31. www.ennonline.net/nex/southasia/resources

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